Computers are learning the art of creativity in more ways than you may know


By Kristen Farrell, Manager of Marketing & Public Relations, Association For Creative Industries (AFCI)

Remember when the Google Arts & Culture App went viral earlier this year? The app introduced a new feature that uses a facial recognition algorithm to match a selfie with a museum portrait.

Google Arts & Culture App

Google has been creating algorithms that recreate art for quite some time. Google’s AutoDraw is an artificial intelligence experiment that helps you draw by combining “the magic of machine learning with drawings from talented artists”Quick, Draw!, another research experiment by Google, trains systems to learn sketches in a way that is very reminiscent of the game Pictionary.

The technology giant isn’t the only participant in this progression. Computer scientists at the Art & Artificial Intelligence Lab at Rutgers University are studying how to use artificial intelligence to replicate “perceptual and cognitive tasks related to human creativity.” Artsy hailed Professor Ahmend Elgammal’s new art-generating algorithm as “The biggest artistic achievement” of 2017.

So, what’s the relevance of all of this?

Computers are learning the art of creativity.

Although algorithms have not yet replaced an artist’s creativity, more research and developments in this area could change that one day soon.

As concerning as this may seem, there is an upside, which is:

Greater awareness and support for art education.

Research commissioned by the Association For Creative Industries (AFCI) suggests that parents recognize creative activity as an essential component of creative thinking. As algorithm art enters the mainstream, it could spawn support for integrating art into STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

Kids painting

Are you experimenting with algorithm art? AFCI is interested in learning how you are utilizing it in your creative business. Share your story by sending an email to kfarrell@afci.global.

This is a portion of an article that appears in the 2018 Spring issue of Gradient, the premier magazine publication of the Association For Creative Industries. To read the full analysis of algorithm art, visit and log in to your member account at gradient.afci.global.

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